About SCBA

Proudly serving South Carolina’s banking industry since 1900, the SCBA is the professional trade association organized to effectively represent the common interest and welfare of the banking industry in South Carolina and to promote the professional development of its members and their employees.

The SCBA’s primary focus is to serve as a reliable and responsive source of information and education regarding areas of importance to the industry, and to be the key advocate in helping our member institutions by providing leadership in legislative, regulatory, educational and value-added services. Products and services offered by our Preferred Vendors and Associate Members assist our member banks in most of their third-party arrangements.

History

In 1900, 16 bankers came together to form a trade association to promote the common interests of banks throughout South Carolina. More than a century later, bankers continue to carry on a professional tradition that has one of the deepest and long-running roles in the country – that of serving as the pre-eminent provider of financial services for individuals, businesses, and communities. With 53 charter members, the Association held its first formal convention in Columbia in April 1902. Annual dues were fixed at $5 for banks with capital of $50,000 or less and $10 for wealthier banks. The association grew rapidly and by 1910 – with 263 of the state’s 267 banks enrolled – ranked first in the nation in percentage of membership.
 
Through war, panic, depressions, recessions, and deregulation, the SCBA has shaped policy and served communities in South Carolina. Here is a brief timeline of events in SCBA’s long-lived history:





1900
South Carolina Bankers Association is formed.

1942
SCBA president F. E. Grier asks at the annual meeting on the heels of
Pearl Harbor, “What contribution is your institution making to the war effort?”

1961
SCBA endows a chair of banking at the college of business
administration of the University of South Carolina.

1967
Palmetto Banker magazine is born.

1971
The Women’s Division of the SCBA is created.
(It was later integrated into the SCBA in the 1980s.)

1997
Savings & Loan League merges with the SCBA.

2010
The SCBA welcomes its first female chairman,
Teresa Knight of The Palmetto Bank.

Proudly serving South Carolina’s banking industry since 1900, the SCBA is the professional trade association organized to effectively represent the common interest and welfare of the banking industry in South Carolina and to promote the professional development of its members and their employees.

The SCBA’s primary focus is to serve as a reliable and responsive source of information and education regarding areas of importance to the industry and to be the key advocate in helping our member institutions by providing leadership in legislative, regulatory, educational and value-added services. Products and services offered by our Preferred Vendors and Associate Members assist our member banks in most of their third-party arrangements.

History

In 1900, 16 bankers came together to form a trade association to promote the common interests of banks throughout South Carolina. More than a century later, bankers continue to carry on a professional tradition that has one of the deepest and long-running roles in the country – that of serving as the pre-eminent provider of financial services for individuals, businesses, and communities. With 53 charter members, the Association held its first formal convention in Columbia in April 1902. Annual dues were fixed at $5 for banks with capital of $50,000 or less and $10 for wealthier banks. The association grew rapidly and by 1910 – with 263 of the state’s 267 banks enrolled – ranked first in the nation in percentage of membership.
 
Through war, panic, depressions, recessions, and deregulation, the SCBA has shaped policy and served communities in South Carolina. Here is a brief timeline of events in SCBA’s long-lived history:





1900
South Carolina Bankers Association is formed.

1942
SCBA president F. E. Grier asks at the annual meeting on the heels of
Pearl Harbor, “What contribution is your institution making to the war effort?”

1961
SCBA endows a chair of banking at the college of business
administration of the University of South Carolina.

1967
Palmetto Banker magazine is born.

1971
The Women’s Division of the SCBA is created.
(It was later integrated into the SCBA in the 1980s.)

1997
Savings & Loan League merges with the SCBA.

2010
The SCBA welcomes its first female chairman,
Teresa Knight of The Palmetto Bank.

  • 1900

    South Carolina Bankers Association is formed.

  • 1942

    SCBA president F. E. Grier asks at the annual meeting on the heels of Pearl Harbor, “What contribution is your institution making to the war effort?”

  • 1961

    SCBA endows a chair of banking at the college of business 
    administration of the University of South Carolina.

  • 1967

    Palmetto Banker magazine is born.

  • 1971

    The Women’s Division of the SCBA is created.
    (It was later integrated into the SCBA in the 1980s.)

  • 1997

    Savings & Loan League merges with the SCBA.

  • 2010

    The SCBA welcomes its first female chairman, 
    Teresa Knight of The Palmetto Bank.

  • 1900

    South Carolina Bankers Association is formed.

  • 1942

    SCBA president F. E. Grier asks at the annual meeting on the heels of Pearl Harbor, “What contribution is your institution making to the war effort?”

  • 1961

    SCBA endows a chair of banking at the college of business 
    administration of the University of South Carolina.

  • 1967

    Palmetto Banker magazine is born.

  • 1971

    The Women’s Division of the SCBA is created.
    (It was later integrated into the SCBA in the 1980s.)

  • 1997

    Savings & Loan League merges with the SCBA.

  • 2010

    The SCBA welcomes its first female chairman, 
    Teresa Knight of The Palmetto Bank.